I ritratti di famiglia a cui siamo abituati tendono ad immortalare una felicità—non sempre reale—per conservarne il ricordo ad imperitura memoria. L’idea della fotografa polacca Joanna Piotrowska è proprio quella di sezionare, quasi chirugicamente, quell’immagine falsamente perfetta per mettere in risalto la tensione che invece è innata nei gruppi familiari. Il suo lavoro è apertamente ispirato alle “Costellazioni familiari e sistemiche” di Bert Hellinger in cui lo psicologo e scrittore tedesco ricollega le dinamiche inconsce che causano sofferenza in molti aspetti della vita dell’individuo ai rapporti familiari.

«I was trying to observe what happens with family members when they’re together and I was sensitive to the details, which I was exagerrating later on the shoots. I see a double meaning in many situations in life and that was how I wanted to show family life too. I focused on gestures, which can be seen ambivalently and ambivalence is known to be psychologically uncomfortable. When we’re not sure about what you see – when you sense there may be something unpleasant, violent or incestuous but can’t point out where exactly it is, you feel confused. Many people have very strong preconceptions about how the world should look, they take things for granted without reflecting on them and questioning common views and beliefs. I think it’s really dangerous to have that attitude. Family is mostly seen as a positive value, but I wanted to point to that element of harm which is inherent in family life too».

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